Last edited by Daijinn
Sunday, August 9, 2020 | History

3 edition of Washington State status report for the Oregon spotted frog found in the catalog.

Washington State status report for the Oregon spotted frog

Kelly R. McAllister

Washington State status report for the Oregon spotted frog

by Kelly R. McAllister

  • 210 Want to read
  • 30 Currently reading

Published by Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife in Olympia, Wash .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Endangered species -- Washington (State),
  • Spotted frog -- Washington (State)

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesOregon spotted frog.
    Statementprepared by Kelly R. McAllister and William P. Leonard.
    ContributionsWashington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationviii, 38 p. :
    Number of Pages38
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17806575M
    OCLC/WorldCa37625017

    Bull, E.L. Ecology of the Columbia spotted frog in northeastern Oregon. General Technical Report PNW-GTR U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. Portland, OR. 46 p. Bull, E.L. Draft. Age and growth in the Columbia spotted frog in northeastern Oregon. takes place after the Oregon Spotted Frog’s breeding season. In order to give the newly formed Oregon Spotted Frog Recovery Team a mandate to begin work prior to the breeding season, the British Columbia Ministry of Environ-ment, Lands and Parks request-ed this emergency listing. In British Columbia, the Oregon Spotted Frog is on the.

    The Oregon spotted frog, Rana pretiosa, which means "precious frog", is a medium-sized water frog. It comes from the Pacific Northwest area of the United States. It can be found in the Puget Trough/Willamette Valley province and the Cascade Mountains of south-central Washington and Oregon. It is a rare frog and is listed by the IUCN as a vulnerable species. Klickitat County, Washington: More pictures of this frog's natural habitat in Washington and Oregon can be seen on the Northwest page. Short Video: An Oregon Spotted frog sitting in a canal in southern Washington in late August.

    The study, approved by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, monitored OSF breeding at the Preserve – recording egg masses (compared to in ) – and included a summer of non-lethal sampling (i.e., capture and release) to document OSF tadpole habitat use, growth and development, and other aspects of the population.. The Preserve is . The Oregon spotted frog is one of the candidate species identified in the May workplan. Start Printed Page Status Assessment for Oregon Spotted Frog Background Species Description. The Oregon spotted frog is named for the characteristic black spots covering the head, back, sides, and legs.


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Amendments to the critical habitat requirements of the Endangered Species Act of 1973

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Washington State status report for the Oregon spotted frog by Kelly R. McAllister Download PDF EPUB FB2

In Washington, the Oregon spotted frog was historically found in the Puget Trough from the Canadian border to the Columbia River and east into the southern Washington Cascades. Oregon spotted frogs breed during late winter or early spring. Washington State status report for the Oregon Spotted Frog.

Wash. Dept. Fish and Wildl., Olympia. Washington State status report for the Oregon spotted frog. Olympia, Wash.: Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, [] (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors.

The Oregon Spotted Frog will be considered for downlisting to Threatened when the following conditions are achieved: Washington has populations in at least six drainages that produce a total of ≥ 7, egg masses annually and each drainage supports a minimum of egg masses from frogs close enough in distribution to exchange genes.

The Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa, meaning "precious frog") is a member of the frog family Ranidae of order Anura. It is a medium-sized aquatic frog endemic to the Pacific Northwest and historically well distributed in the Puget Trough/Willamette Valley province and the Cascade Mountains of south-central Washington and : Ranidae.

Oregon spotted frog recovery. The Oregon Zoo and its conservation partners are working to repopulate the historic range of the Oregon spotted frog. With the notable exception of Conboy Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Oregon spotted frogs have disappeared from almost every wetland containing bullfrogs.

The Oregon spotted frog, Rana pretiosa, which means "precious frog", is a medium-sized water frog. It comes from the Pacific Northwest area of North can be found in the Puget Trough/Willamette Valley province and the Cascade Mountains of south-central Washington and Oregon.

It is a rare frog and is listed by the IUCN as a vulnerable species. Class: Amphibia. Oregon spotted frog screen 2 Suggested citation: Germaine, S. and B. Cosentino.

Screening Model for Determining Likelihood of Site Occupancy by Oregon Spotted Frogs (Rana pretiosa) in Washington State. Final Report.

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, Washington, USA. Cover photos by Steve Germaine. The Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa) is a medium-sized anuran native to the northwestern United coloration ranges from brown or tan to brick red, usually overlaid with dark, ragged spots.

Oregon spotted frogs can be distinguished from other native species by their relatively short hind legs, orange or red wash of color on underside of abdomen and legs, and. Hayes Status of the Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa sensu stricto) in the Deschutes Basin and selected other systems in Oregon and northeastern California with a rangewide synopsis of the.

Species profile about species listing status, federal register publications, recovery, critical habitat, conservation planning, petitions, and life history U.S.

Fish & Wildlife Service ECOS Environmental Conservation Online System. The Oregon Spotted Frog (Rana pretiosa), a federally threatened species also listed as endangered in Washington State, has a historical distribution that extends from southwestern British Columbia. Hallock.

Draft State of Washington Oregon Spotted Frog Recovery Plan. Holmes et al. Species ID Genetic Differentiation Ranid Frog Pop NOCA Environmental Laboratory. Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual. Hayes et al. WDFW Bat Conservation Plan. Hruby. Washington State Wetland Rating System for Western WA.

California [Internet] Oregon Spotted Frog Rana pretiosa. - Haycock, R.D. COSEWIC status report on the Oregon spotted frog Rana pretiosa in Canada, in COSEWIC assessment and status report on the Oregon spotted frog Rana pretiosa in Canada Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada.

Ottawa. xi + 47 pp. This report was prepared in fulfillment of Oregon/Washington BLM Assistance Agreement L09ACfor the Interagency Special Status Species/Sensitive Species Program OR/WA BLM - R6 Forest Service How to cite: Robertson, J.M., and W.C.

Funk. Population genetic analysis of Oregon spotted frogs (Rana pretiosa) in Oregon. Final report. Species Status: Endangered in Canada; Vulnerable globally (IUCN assessment) Action Required: Conservation breeding, headstarting, reintroduction and population augmentation The Oregon spotted frog’s scientific name “pretiosa” means “precious” in Latin — a fitting moniker considering that not many only a few hundred individuals left, the Oregon spotted frog is the.

Bohannon, J., D. Gay, C.O. Johnson, M. Widner and C. Bauman. Oregon spotted frog presence surveys in Skagit and Whatcom Counties, Washington.

Final report on the and surveys submitted to USFWS, Region 1, Washington Fish and Wildlife Office. 20 pp. + appendices. Hallock, L. Draft Washington state recovery plan for the.

The Oregon spotted frog is believed to have lost at least 78%, and possibly as much as 90%, of its former habitat and is no longer found in the state of California as a result of habitat loss, invasive plants, and the introduction of non-native predators.

The Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa) was once abundant in the Pacific Northwest, found in wetlands and lowlands spanning from southwestern BC down to the northern tip of California.

However, in COSEWIC (the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada) declared the Oregon spotted frog an endangered species. What do they look like. Adults are medium-sized, reaching lengths of 65 mm (males) to mm (females).

Dorsal coloration ranges from brown to tan or olive-green, with dark black or brown irregularly-shaped spots on the back, sides and legs; spots typically have lighter center. We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), designate critical habitat for the Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa) under the Endangered Species Act.

In total, approximat acres (26, hectares) and river miles ( river kilometers) in. Status of and Recovery Options for the Oregon Spotted Frog in the Willamette Valley Page 3 I. Problem Statement The Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa, hereafter OSF) is a candidate species for listing under the US Endangered Species Act.

It is listed as Endangered in Washington and British Size: KB. Oregon Spotted Frog On an exclusive viewing tour on a slough on the upper river near LaPine State Park, scientists pointed out spotted frog egg masses laid during recent warm weather in early April.

Freilich spent 13 years as chief of research for the Olympic National Park in Washington and is considered a river flow regime expert.

Much.Worldwide, frogs and toads are in trouble because of habitat loss, pollution, pesticides, climate change, diseases, the pet trade and competition from invasive species.

Many of Oregon's 12 native species of frogs and toads are listed as Oregon Conservation Strategy Species of concern.